Mathematical Models with Applications

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Prerequisite: Algebra 2
HALF-CREDIT OPTIONS AVAILABLE: MATH MODELS A, MATH MODELS B

In Mathematical Models with Applications, you will learn to apply mathematics through experiences in personal finance, science, engineering, fine arts, and social sciences. You will use algebraic, graphical, and geometric reasoning to recognize patterns and structure, model information, solve problems, and communicate solutions. Along the way, you will select from a variety of tools including manipulatives, technology, and data collection devices. This course takes an integrated approach to mathematics as you further your skills in the disciplines of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and probability and statistics.

Precalculus

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PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 2
HALF-CREDIT OPTIONS AVAILABLE: PRECALCULUS A, PRECALCULUS B
This is an honors course.

Included in this course is a further depth study of functions, quadratics, logarithms, coordinate geometry, vectors, trigonometry probability and statistics with the addition of differentiation, integration and differential equations. You will develop mathematical knowledge that will increase your ability to communicate and reason with mathematical concepts. This course offer a solid foundation for further study of mathematical relationships.

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Calculus

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PREREQUISITE: PRECALCULUS
HALF-CREDIT OPTIONS AVAILABLE: CALCULUS A, CALCULUS B
This is an honors course.

Calculus plays an important role in science, medicine, sociology and economics. Consequently, it is important for everyone to learn. The objective of this course is to enable students not just to recognize concepts, but learn to work with them in ways that will be useful in their future careers and life. The course uses a logical progression from fundamental to advanced concepts so that students can make more connections between theories and applications. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, related rates, optimization, integration, area under the curve, volumes of revolution, and centers of mass.

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World History

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HALF-CREDIT OPTIONS AVAILABLE; WORLD HISTORY A, WORLD HISTORY B
Honors course available

In Part A, you’ll explore major historical events around the world throughout. In the first unit, you’ll develop your historical thinking skills. In the second and third units, you’ll learn about the major religions and classical civilizations of several regions around the world. In the fourth unit, you’ll examine the origins and developments of European exploration. In the fifth unit, you’ll learn about the causes and effects of the Renaissance and the Reformation. In the sixth unit, you’ll explore revolutions that occurred from 1789 to 1848, including the Scientific Revolution, the American Revolution, and the French Revolution.

In Part B, you’ll explore major historical events around the world. In the first unit, you’ll explore the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution, the spread of nationalism in Europe, and the Russian Revolution. In the second unit, you’ll analyze imperialism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and examine the causes and consequences of World War I. In the third unit, you’ll study World War II, analyzing the factors that started the war and the impact of the war. In the fourth unit, you’ll explore the rise and fall of communism in the Soviet Union and China and learn about the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. In the fifth unit, you’ll analyze the effects of decolonization in Southeast Asia and Africa. You’ll also study the modernization of China and the rise of nationalism in the Middle East. In the last unit, you’ll explore economic globalization and evaluate the benefits and challenges of living in the modern world.

Probability and Statistics

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Prerequisite: Algebra 2
Half-credit course

Probability and Statistics is a mathematics course that teaches two related but distinguishable disciplines. Probability is the study of the likelihood that an event will occur. For example, what is the likelihood that you will win a writing contest if there are 3,000 entries? What are the chances that you will land that lead role in the school play if 30 students audition? In statistics, you will practice the science of collecting and analyzing numerical data in order to make decisions. The study of statistics upholds that of probability. You’ve likely worked with both disciplines to varying degrees during your math education. 

In this course, you will represent and interpret data using dot plots, histograms, box plots, two-way frequency tables, and scatter plots. You will study normal distributions and distinguish between correlation and causation. You will also determine the conditional probability of two events or whether the events are independent. Using counting techniques and the rules of probability, you will calculate probabilities and use the results to make educated and fair decisions. You will evaluate several data collection techniques and statistical models, including simulations. The course closes with information on how you can use probability models to represent situations arising in everyday life that involve both payoff and risk.

US History

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HALF-CREDIT OPTIONS AVAILABLE; US HISTORY A, US HISTORY B
Honors course available

US History is the study of the events, people, and culture of the United States over time. In US History Part A, you will learn about the process of historical inquiry, review the events and principles behind the founding of the United States, and then apply historical inquiry to analyze societal issues, trends, and events from the Civil War through the rise of US imperialism. You’ll explore timelines to gain an understanding of how events link to each other, and you’ll analyze historical documents for a firsthand sense of how events unfolded. You’ll also gather evidence from relevant documents and historical texts in order to develop credible explanations of events in US history. You’ll then use that evidence to evaluate change and continuity over time by writing essays and creating presentations about broad periods of historical development.

In US History Part B, you will apply historical inquiry to analyze societal issues, trends, and events of US history from World War I to the present, including the Cold War, Civil Rights and other social movements, the Vietnam War, modern presidencies, and responses to global terrorism. You’ll explore timelines to gain an understanding of how events link to each other, and you’ll analyze historical documents for a firsthand sense of how events unfolded. You’ll also gather evidence from relevant documents and historical texts in order to develop credible explanations of events in US history. You’ll then use that evidence to evaluate change and continuity over time.

Government

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HALF-CREDIT COURSE
Honors course available

With great freedom, comes great responsibility. Become an expert in responsible citizenship as you study the purposes, principles, and practices of American government as established by the U.S. Constitution. In this course, you will learn how and why the U.S. Government was developed, and how it currently operates. Included in this exploration will be the historical context for the creation of the U.S. Constitution and the three branches of the government, Executive, Legislative, and Judicial. You will also learn about the role of state and local governments, all while contemplating how and why citizens can participate responsibly within these contexts.

Economics

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HALF-CREDIT COURSE
Honors course available

How does our modern economy work? In this course, you will examine the allocation of scarce resources and the economic reasoning used by government agencies and by people as consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, and voters. As you prepare for college, career, and life, you will examine the key economic philosophies and economists who have influenced the economies around the world in the past and present.

Physical Science

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HALF-CREDIT OPTIONS AVAILABLE; PHYSICAL SCIENCE A, PHYSICAL SCIENCE B

In this course, you will have the opportunity to explore the characteristics of objects and materials that you encounter daily. You will gain an understanding of the nature of matter and energy, including their forms, the changes they undergo, and their interactions. You will develop an understanding of the fundamental laws of motion, knowledge of the various ways energy is stored in a system, and the processes by which energy is transferred between systems and surroundings. You will participate in regular in-person labs (with materials available at home or a school lab site), and experience experiments that are supplemented with other virtual reality experiences.

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Physics

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HALF-CREDIT OPTIONS AVAILABLE; PHYSICS A, PHYSICS B
Honors course available

This course helps learners understand the technological world in which they live and take an informed interest in science and scientific developments. You will learn about the basic principles of physics through a mix of theoretical and practical studies. You will also gain an understanding of how science is studied and practiced, and become aware that the results of scientific research can have both good and bad effects on individuals, communities, and the environment. You will participate in regular in-person labs (with materials available at home or a school lab site), and experience experiments that are supplemented with other virtual reality experiences.