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Forbes names ASU as top employer in Arizona

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Article written by Krista Hinz. Originally published on ASU News 

August 25, 2022

Arizona State University has been named one of America’s Best Employers By State for 2022 by Forbes.

In partnership with Statista, a global provider of rankings and large-scale polling, Forbes surveyed 70,000 U.S. employees across 25 industry sectors and considered employee experiences such as working conditions, salary, potential for growth and diversity.

Audrey Dumouchel-Jones, ASU’s interim vice president and chief human resources officer, said the award showcases ASU’s reputation as a company that provides excellent employment opportunities at the local and national level.

“Our employees drive ASU’s standard of excellence. This award reflects our talented workforce supporting our ASU Charter and striving to build an inclusive and supportive culture for our students and community,” she said. “We are proud to offer all Arizonans exciting development opportunities and a chance to grow their careers.”

In addition to the career advancement opportunities at ASU, other benefits include 12 weeks of paid parental leave (expanded from six in July 2019), adoption and fertility subsidies, paid time off for volunteer service and an emergency child and elder care program.

Of the thousands of companies eligible for this recognition, only a select few are awarded in each state. The award may also reflect Arizona’s rapid growth in the last several years. According to 2020 census data, Phoenix grew in population at a rate of 11.2% (1.45 million people in 2010 to about 1.6 million in 2020), while Arizona has five of the 15 fastest-growing cities in the U.S., including Queen Creek, Buckeye, Casa Grande, Maricopa and Goodyear.

Forbes and Statista collected direct recommendations from employees as well as indirect recommendations from workers in the industry. Since the employee experience can vary greatly depending on an organization’s size and the individual worker, the rankings look at large and midsize employers. Beginning in 2015 with America’s Best Employers, Forbes and Statista have since expanded the coverage to include those employers considered best for diversity, women and new graduates. 

Forbes names ASU as top employer in Arizona

« Back  |  

Article written by Krista Hinz. Originally published on ASU News 

August 25, 2022

Arizona State University has been named one of America’s Best Employers By State for 2022 by Forbes.

In partnership with Statista, a global provider of rankings and large-scale polling, Forbes surveyed 70,000 U.S. employees across 25 industry sectors and considered employee experiences such as working conditions, salary, potential for growth and diversity.

Audrey Dumouchel-Jones, ASU’s interim vice president and chief human resources officer, said the award showcases ASU’s reputation as a company that provides excellent employment opportunities at the local and national level.

“Our employees drive ASU’s standard of excellence. This award reflects our talented workforce supporting our ASU Charter and striving to build an inclusive and supportive culture for our students and community,” she said. “We are proud to offer all Arizonans exciting development opportunities and a chance to grow their careers.”

In addition to the career advancement opportunities at ASU, other benefits include 12 weeks of paid parental leave (expanded from six in July 2019), adoption and fertility subsidies, paid time off for volunteer service and an emergency child and elder care program.

Of the thousands of companies eligible for this recognition, only a select few are awarded in each state. The award may also reflect Arizona’s rapid growth in the last several years. According to 2020 census data, Phoenix grew in population at a rate of 11.2% (1.45 million people in 2010 to about 1.6 million in 2020), while Arizona has five of the 15 fastest-growing cities in the U.S., including Queen Creek, Buckeye, Casa Grande, Maricopa and Goodyear.

Forbes and Statista collected direct recommendations from employees as well as indirect recommendations from workers in the industry. Since the employee experience can vary greatly depending on an organization’s size and the individual worker, the rankings look at large and midsize employers. Beginning in 2015 with America’s Best Employers, Forbes and Statista have since expanded the coverage to include those employers considered best for diversity, women and new graduates. 

Forbes names ASU as top employer in Arizona

« Back  |  

Article written by Krista Hinz. Originally published on ASU News 

August 25, 2022

Arizona State University has been named one of America’s Best Employers By State for 2022 by Forbes.

In partnership with Statista, a global provider of rankings and large-scale polling, Forbes surveyed 70,000 U.S. employees across 25 industry sectors and considered employee experiences such as working conditions, salary, potential for growth and diversity.

Audrey Dumouchel-Jones, ASU’s interim vice president and chief human resources officer, said the award showcases ASU’s reputation as a company that provides excellent employment opportunities at the local and national level.

“Our employees drive ASU’s standard of excellence. This award reflects our talented workforce supporting our ASU Charter and striving to build an inclusive and supportive culture for our students and community,” she said. “We are proud to offer all Arizonans exciting development opportunities and a chance to grow their careers.”

In addition to the career advancement opportunities at ASU, other benefits include 12 weeks of paid parental leave (expanded from six in July 2019), adoption and fertility subsidies, paid time off for volunteer service and an emergency child and elder care program.

Of the thousands of companies eligible for this recognition, only a select few are awarded in each state. The award may also reflect Arizona’s rapid growth in the last several years. According to 2020 census data, Phoenix grew in population at a rate of 11.2% (1.45 million people in 2010 to about 1.6 million in 2020), while Arizona has five of the 15 fastest-growing cities in the U.S., including Queen Creek, Buckeye, Casa Grande, Maricopa and Goodyear.

Forbes and Statista collected direct recommendations from employees as well as indirect recommendations from workers in the industry. Since the employee experience can vary greatly depending on an organization’s size and the individual worker, the rankings look at large and midsize employers. Beginning in 2015 with America’s Best Employers, Forbes and Statista have since expanded the coverage to include those employers considered best for diversity, women and new graduates. 

Forbes names ASU as top employer in Arizona

« Back  |  

Article written by Krista Hinz. Originally published on ASU News 

August 25, 2022

Arizona State University has been named one of America’s Best Employers By State for 2022 by Forbes.

In partnership with Statista, a global provider of rankings and large-scale polling, Forbes surveyed 70,000 U.S. employees across 25 industry sectors and considered employee experiences such as working conditions, salary, potential for growth and diversity.

Audrey Dumouchel-Jones, ASU’s interim vice president and chief human resources officer, said the award showcases ASU’s reputation as a company that provides excellent employment opportunities at the local and national level.

“Our employees drive ASU’s standard of excellence. This award reflects our talented workforce supporting our ASU Charter and striving to build an inclusive and supportive culture for our students and community,” she said. “We are proud to offer all Arizonans exciting development opportunities and a chance to grow their careers.”

In addition to the career advancement opportunities at ASU, other benefits include 12 weeks of paid parental leave (expanded from six in July 2019), adoption and fertility subsidies, paid time off for volunteer service and an emergency child and elder care program.

Of the thousands of companies eligible for this recognition, only a select few are awarded in each state. The award may also reflect Arizona’s rapid growth in the last several years. According to 2020 census data, Phoenix grew in population at a rate of 11.2% (1.45 million people in 2010 to about 1.6 million in 2020), while Arizona has five of the 15 fastest-growing cities in the U.S., including Queen Creek, Buckeye, Casa Grande, Maricopa and Goodyear.

Forbes and Statista collected direct recommendations from employees as well as indirect recommendations from workers in the industry. Since the employee experience can vary greatly depending on an organization’s size and the individual worker, the rankings look at large and midsize employers. Beginning in 2015 with America’s Best Employers, Forbes and Statista have since expanded the coverage to include those employers considered best for diversity, women and new graduates. 

Forbes names ASU as top employer in Arizona

« Back  |  

Article written by Krista Hinz. Originally published on ASU News 

August 25, 2022

Arizona State University has been named one of America’s Best Employers By State for 2022 by Forbes.

In partnership with Statista, a global provider of rankings and large-scale polling, Forbes surveyed 70,000 U.S. employees across 25 industry sectors and considered employee experiences such as working conditions, salary, potential for growth and diversity.

Audrey Dumouchel-Jones, ASU’s interim vice president and chief human resources officer, said the award showcases ASU’s reputation as a company that provides excellent employment opportunities at the local and national level.

“Our employees drive ASU’s standard of excellence. This award reflects our talented workforce supporting our ASU Charter and striving to build an inclusive and supportive culture for our students and community,” she said. “We are proud to offer all Arizonans exciting development opportunities and a chance to grow their careers.”

In addition to the career advancement opportunities at ASU, other benefits include 12 weeks of paid parental leave (expanded from six in July 2019), adoption and fertility subsidies, paid time off for volunteer service and an emergency child and elder care program.

Of the thousands of companies eligible for this recognition, only a select few are awarded in each state. The award may also reflect Arizona’s rapid growth in the last several years. According to 2020 census data, Phoenix grew in population at a rate of 11.2% (1.45 million people in 2010 to about 1.6 million in 2020), while Arizona has five of the 15 fastest-growing cities in the U.S., including Queen Creek, Buckeye, Casa Grande, Maricopa and Goodyear.

Forbes and Statista collected direct recommendations from employees as well as indirect recommendations from workers in the industry. Since the employee experience can vary greatly depending on an organization’s size and the individual worker, the rankings look at large and midsize employers. Beginning in 2015 with America’s Best Employers, Forbes and Statista have since expanded the coverage to include those employers considered best for diversity, women and new graduates. 

Forbes names ASU as top employer in Arizona

« Back  |  

Article written by Krista Hinz. Originally published on ASU News 

August 25, 2022

Arizona State University has been named one of America’s Best Employers By State for 2022 by Forbes.

In partnership with Statista, a global provider of rankings and large-scale polling, Forbes surveyed 70,000 U.S. employees across 25 industry sectors and considered employee experiences such as working conditions, salary, potential for growth and diversity.

Audrey Dumouchel-Jones, ASU’s interim vice president and chief human resources officer, said the award showcases ASU’s reputation as a company that provides excellent employment opportunities at the local and national level.

“Our employees drive ASU’s standard of excellence. This award reflects our talented workforce supporting our ASU Charter and striving to build an inclusive and supportive culture for our students and community,” she said. “We are proud to offer all Arizonans exciting development opportunities and a chance to grow their careers.”

In addition to the career advancement opportunities at ASU, other benefits include 12 weeks of paid parental leave (expanded from six in July 2019), adoption and fertility subsidies, paid time off for volunteer service and an emergency child and elder care program.

Of the thousands of companies eligible for this recognition, only a select few are awarded in each state. The award may also reflect Arizona’s rapid growth in the last several years. According to 2020 census data, Phoenix grew in population at a rate of 11.2% (1.45 million people in 2010 to about 1.6 million in 2020), while Arizona has five of the 15 fastest-growing cities in the U.S., including Queen Creek, Buckeye, Casa Grande, Maricopa and Goodyear.

Forbes and Statista collected direct recommendations from employees as well as indirect recommendations from workers in the industry. Since the employee experience can vary greatly depending on an organization’s size and the individual worker, the rankings look at large and midsize employers. Beginning in 2015 with America’s Best Employers, Forbes and Statista have since expanded the coverage to include those employers considered best for diversity, women and new graduates. 

Welcome Dr. Taime Bengochea

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K-12 Principal at ASU Prep South Phoenix

 
ASU Preparatory Academy is pleased to welcome Dr. Taime Bengochea to the team. Bengochea, often referred to as Dr. B, has built strong relationships in public education for the last 30 years. She is passionate about supporting students in finding their own pathway to success and working to support her staff in the ever-changing climate of education.

A respected and trusted leader, she has advocated for thousands of students and staff members across the Valley. Bengochea has held a variety of positions as a teacher, director of technology, assistant principal, and principal, and she has taught graduate courses for Argosy University in finance and educational leadership.  

She is an Arizona State University alumnus and received her graduate degree in elementary education. She has a master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Phoenix, and a doctorate in educational leadership and policy from Pepperdine University in California.

When not at work, she enjoys spending time with her family and pets, which includes three dogs and a crested gecko named Figment.

Principal Taime Bengochea can be reached at: Taime.Bengochea@asu.edu

Supporting Struggling Readers Through the Science of Reading

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Reading is one of the most fundamental ingredients to life. It provides a window to the world and opens doors. Reading gets your mind working across different areas—stimulates imagination, recounts memories, and uses analytical abilities. Frederick Douglass said, “Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.”

Yet there are many people who struggle to become proficient readers.  

Literacy Facts 

One in five U.S. adults (21 percent) are illiterate. This translates into 43 million U.S. adults who possess low literacy skills, meaning they do not possess the skills necessary to complete tasks that require comparing and contrasting, paraphrasing, or making low-level inferences.    

In 2019, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, 34 percent of 4th-grade students read below the Average National Assessment of Educational Progress basic reading level.

Have you ever wondered why some children have difficulty learning to read and question why they struggle?  

The Science Behind Reading 

The term “science of reading” refers to the research cognitive scientists and reading experts have conducted for more than 20 years on how we learn to read. This new understanding has helped debunk older methods of reading instruction that were based on tradition and observation, not evidence.

Developed by Arizona Virtual Teacher Institute, the “Science of Reading: Supporting Struggling Readers” is a series that teaches participants how the brain learns to read and what instructional steps are needed to build a “reading” brain.

“One question we get over and over again is, what do I do with students who are reading five levels below the grade level I’m teaching at?” said Heide Morton, Lead Training Specialist at ASU Prep Digital. “Reading is embedded in all aspects of content—whether teaching math or science—we’re all reading teachers.”

In this teacher training series, participants will first be immersed in how the brain works and how it learns to read. There are seven Science of Reading principles, and the first principle is: Reading is not natural; it must be taught. Scarborough’s Reading Rope, which includes word recognition and language comprehension, will also be covered. This professional development session is free for Arizona teachers.

Morton, an educator for 17 years, said this series is especially beneficial for 3rd-8th grade educators, but can be for higher grades as well. “This age in particular is where we see a noticeable gap between proficient and struggling readers.”

Participants will discover why some children have difficulties learning to read and the training then moves into diagnostics and assessments. The last portion of the series is resources and proven strategies to help struggling readers before, during and after reading.

“Science-based reading instruction reduces the need for intervention and allows children to move forward as capable and confident learners,” said Morton. “We have a shared responsibility to help students build their reading skills. It’s all hands on deck. We need to work together.”


Resources

National Center for Education Statistics
Adult Literacy in the United States

If you’re interested in bringing ASU Prep Digital Science of Reading: Supporting Struggling Readers teacher training to your school or district, please visit asuprepdigital.org/training.   

Sal Khan to Lead Student Seminars at Khan World School at ASU Prep

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The Khan World School at ASU Prep is opening to passionate ninth grade students starting in August. And some of that world-class learning will be lead by Sal Khan himself. Well known in the education world as the founder of Khan Academy and Schoolhouse.world, Sal plans to join the faculty for this inaugural class of students. Please watch his announcement below.

Learn more about this exciting online school model at khanworldschool.org

Behind Khan Academy And Arizona State University’s Khan World School Launch

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Previously published on Forbes.com

Michael B. Horn

I write about transforming education so it can allow all students to build their passions and fulfill their potential.

The Khan Academy and Arizona State University Prep Digital’s partnership to launch the Khan World School, a virtual school for high schoolers, brings together two of the powerhouses in digital learning with the promise of creating a breakthrough schooling model.

With the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and the rush to virtual schooling—or what some have termed emergency remote schooling—the results have been unsurprisingly poor. Many studies show that the students in the schools that remained remote longer have suffered greater learning loss.

Out of this challenge, Sal Khan told me that there was a sense that the Khan Academy had a responsibility to create something more robust.

“We have to create kind of an infrastructure for the world,” Khan said. “There’s a strategic oil reserve. There should be a strategic education reserve of systems and processes that in an emergency time a lot of people can lean on.”

As Amy McGrath, COO at ASU Prep Digital said, “Everyone was doing online, but not very well.… But our infrastructure that has been in design for quite some time really thrived. And our learners, in fact, outperformed state averages.”

As the Khan Academy and ASU Prep Digital launch the Khan World School in the fall, here are three areas where the design should result in important advances for education more broadly.

Social

The stereotype of online learning is that, ‘Oh, you’re just doing your own thing, you feel detached from other people,’” Khan said. “Honestly, that’s the stereotype of some in-person learning as well. You’re just sitting in a classroom and your eyes are glazed over.”

The Khan World School is aiming to tackle that stereotype with a daily, synchronous seminar where students debate topics that often aren’t discussed in schools—things like “Will the Fed be able to control inflation? Will CRISPR change the human genome? And [should] social media be blamed for the polarization in the world?,” Khan said.

“We want to be able to have a place where we can have conversations, and teach students, and maybe the world, that there’s a way to have conversations and to be able to disagree about these things, but be able to do it respectfully, and learn from each other,” Khan said.

I argue in my forthcoming book, “From Reopen to Reinvent,” that this should be one of the six central purposes of K­–12 schools: to help students understand that people can see things differently—and that those differences merit respect rather than persecution.

These seminar groupings would include mixed-age learning—a key tenet of the Khan Lab School, a Silicon Valley-based school that Khan and his team have been operating since 2014. The goal? To unlock human connection.

Mastery

The next part of the Khan World School will tackle students’ core learning with a focus on student mastery.

The way in which the school will assess mastery is what’s perhaps most novel. Khan Academy operates a tutoring site called Schoolhouse.world, which is also a platform to validate mastery.

In essence, students record their face and screen as they take a Khan Academy assessment and explain their reasoning out loud. That video artifact is then peer reviewed by others on the platform who have already proved their mastery of the concept to assess whether a student has mastered at least 90% of the concept.

The platform is designed to authenticate that someone’s work is in fact their own to eliminate cheating and verify mastery.

“If anyone ever doubts it, they can click on that video and watch you perform it,” Khan said. “It’s a far better signal than saying someone got a 95% on a test that they took 10 years ago.”

This mechanism also allows students to show what they’ve mastered outside of the traditional school curriculum—say in their outside reading and writing.

According to Khan, this also showcases a student’s communication skills. And for students who help vet other people’s learning, it also shows a signal of compassion and caring.

“Schools like MIT, University Chicago, Case Western, they’ve already put it on their admissions application, because they think this is a such a powerful signal of student mastery and student personality or student desire to give back,” he said.

What’s more, McGrath argues that the Khan World School will help blur the lines between high school and college. ASU Prep Digital already allows high school students to take real college courses from ASU. And according to Khan, the Khan Academy has started pilots with Howard University, in which students are able to earn college algebra credits while in high school if they demonstrate mastery on the appropriate material.

Value

At present, the Khan World School is drawing interest from students around the world. The school will be free for students in Arizona by taking advantage of ASU’s charter school. But for those localities where it isn’t a public option, Khan said that they will be able to offer the school for less than $10,000.

What’s exciting is that affordability comes with quality and the ability to allow students to master concepts on their own time and pace, not at arbitrary junctions.

“We have over 50 efficacy studies at Khan Academy,” Khan said. “We just have a recent one just came out. If students are able to put in even 20 minutes a day for three days a week, doing mastery learning in math, they’re going 50% to 100% faster than their comparable peers…. That’s just an hour a week doing that. Now, imagine Khan World School where that is the way that we’re going to learn everything. You’re just going to have a really strong foundation.”

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here.
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