US History

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HALF-CREDIT OPTIONS AVAILABLE; US HISTORY A, US HISTORY B
Honors course available

US History is the study of the events, people, and culture of the United States over time. In US History Part A, you will learn about the process of historical inquiry, review the events and principles behind the founding of the United States, and then apply historical inquiry to analyze societal issues, trends, and events from the Civil War through the rise of US imperialism. You’ll explore timelines to gain an understanding of how events link to each other, and you’ll analyze historical documents for a firsthand sense of how events unfolded. You’ll also gather evidence from relevant documents and historical texts in order to develop credible explanations of events in US history. You’ll then use that evidence to evaluate change and continuity over time by writing essays and creating presentations about broad periods of historical development.

In US History Part B, you will apply historical inquiry to analyze societal issues, trends, and events of US history from World War I to the present, including the Cold War, Civil Rights and other social movements, the Vietnam War, modern presidencies, and responses to global terrorism. You’ll explore timelines to gain an understanding of how events link to each other, and you’ll analyze historical documents for a firsthand sense of how events unfolded. You’ll also gather evidence from relevant documents and historical texts in order to develop credible explanations of events in US history. You’ll then use that evidence to evaluate change and continuity over time.

Government

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HALF-CREDIT COURSE
Honors course available

With great freedom, comes great responsibility. Become an expert in responsible citizenship as you study the purposes, principles, and practices of American government as established by the U.S. Constitution. In this course, you will learn how and why the U.S. Government was developed, and how it currently operates. Included in this exploration will be the historical context for the creation of the U.S. Constitution and the three branches of the government, Executive, Legislative, and Judicial. You will also learn about the role of state and local governments, all while contemplating how and why citizens can participate responsibly within these contexts.

Economics

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HALF-CREDIT COURSE
Honors course available

How does our modern economy work? In this course, you will examine the allocation of scarce resources and the economic reasoning used by government agencies and by people as consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, and voters. As you prepare for college, career, and life, you will examine the key economic philosophies and economists who have influenced the economies around the world in the past and present.